Dealing With Distractions In Mindfulness Meditation

Dealing With Distractions In Mindfulness Meditation

Dealing With Distractions In Mindfulness Meditation. So, there you are, meditating beautifully. Your body is totally immobile, and your mind is totally still; You just glide right along following the flow of the breath, in, out, in, out….calm, serene and concentrated. Everything is perfect. And then, all of a sudden, something totally different pops into your mind; “I sure wish I had an ice cream cone.”. That’s a distraction, obviously, that’s not what you are supposed to be doing. You notice that, and you drag yourself back to the breath, back to the smooth flow, in, out, in……And then; “Did I ever pay that cell ‘phone bill”? Another distraction. You notice that one, and you haul yourself back to the breath. In, out, in, out, in……”That new science fiction movie is out. Maybe I can see it with my partner on Tuesday” No, not on Tuesday, got too much to do. Thursday’s better”…….. Another distraction. You pull yourself out of that one, and back you go to the breath, except that you never quite get there, because before you do, that little voice in your head says ”My back is killing me”. On and on it goes, distraction after distraction, seemingly without end.
What a bother. But this is what it is all about. These distractions are actually the whole point. The key is to learn to deal with these things. Learning to notice them without being trapped in them. That’s what we are here for.

Thoughts During Meditation

Thoughts During Meditation

Thoughts During Meditation. Many people make the mistake of thinking that meditation requires them to shut off their thinking or their feelings. They somehow hear the instructions as meaning that if they are thinking, that is “bad”, and that a “good meditation” is one in which there is little or no thinking. Thinking is not bad, nor is it even undesirable during meditation. What matters is whether you are aware of your thoughts and feelings during meditation and how you are in relationship to them. Trying to suppress them will only result in greater tension and frustration and more problems, not in calmness, insight, clarity and peace.

We are not trying to stop our thoughts as they cascade through the mind. We are simply making room for them, observing them as thoughts, and letting them be, using the breath as our anchor or “home base” for observing, for reminding us to stay focused and calm. It might help to keep in mind that the awareness of our thoughts and emotions is the same awareness as the awareness of our breathing.

Learn How to Alleviate Stress

Learn How to Alleviate Stress

Stress is a natural emotion. It is your response to a troubling and upsetting situation. Worldwide we are all facing difficult times; Terrorism and economic downturns create fears of impaired safety, loss of earnings and debt. These fears affect our health, thinking and relationships. It seems like practically everything we once knew is changing at a pace beyond which most people can adjust to in a happy and healthy way. Instead the human emotional landscape is being filled with fear and worry. Research indicates that 35% of illness starts with worrying about “what if” while 75% of doctor visits are stress related.
Stress will always be with us because contrary to popular belief, stress is not just pressure from outside – those are the stressors, it is also your individual response to those stressors.

Daily Mindfulness Meditation

Daily Mindfulness Meditation

Daily mindfulness meditation keeps the mind and body balanced. Mindfulness meditation helps us to be aware of our internal and external world – what we are seeing, hearing, feeling, our internal dialogue, thoughts and emotions. When we are aware, we are conscious; When we are conscious we can choose a different way of being.

Learn more about Mindfulness Meditation…………

Are you Stressed, Anxious or Depressed?

Are you Stressed, Anxious or Depressed?

Are you stressed, anxious or depressed? When this happens we may feel weak and it seems we have little control of how we think, feel and behave. There are several techniques that a person can learn quite easily to begin to enjoy life again.
The rates of depression have risen by almost 1000% since 1945. There are many reasons for this increase one of which is because depression has largely become de-stigmatised and there is less shame attached to admitting to suffering. There is, however, no gene for depression and no physical test at the doctors to see if you are depressed or not.

Depression has a ripple effect from the individual out to family, relationships, work and physical health. A depressed person feels hopeless and lacks motivation. This leads to them often being passive. They have black and white thinking and spend a lot of time ruminating on negative thoughts. This creates stress and anxiety (even if there seems to be a degree of flatness). And quite often a person has exaggerated emotional response to things.